How to Sell a New Tool to Your Team

It’s incredible how quickly a new app or software can help you recover from productivity slumps, enhance data security, ensure connectivity, and so much more. This is why businesses always stay on the lookout for emerging technologies and rush to adopt any idea, app, or technology that promises them a competitive edge.

However, selling these new resources to your teams is easier said than done. Employees often hesitate because they fear the time and effort required to learn how to use these tools. Also, they often can’t see the benefits and are reluctant about any change.

However, gaining your team’s buy-in for a new tool doesn’t have to be complicated. You can convince your coworkers to adopt amazing new tools and technologies by taking a strategic approach and selling them the solution instead of the product.

10 tips to help you sell a new tool to your team

What can you do as a manager to ensure the equipment you invest in gets used? As an operations manager, you must follow these guidelines before releasing a new tool:

1. Explain why the organization needs to adopt this tool     

The most important quality in a leader is honesty, and “technology laggards” will appreciate it when their superiors are upfront about using the new technology and the reasons for its implementation.

So always return to the initial question, “Why do we need this tool? ” whether you’re just starting to introduce it or nearing the completion of implementation.                

While explaining your personal interest is a strong argument, it is not sufficient. It’s important to tell your team about the difficulties your organization face on a regular basis because of the lack of efficiency in your business processes.

In what ways does this brand-new tool improve upon previous attempts to address these concerns? How might its functions enhance your business processes?

Bringing attention to these pain points is essential. These specific problems might be unknown to your team members or employees. That’s why these points of view might convince them to change their minds and adopt the tool.

2. Introduce the benefits of the new tool

Now that everyone knows the reasons the organization is adopting the tool, you need to tell them how the individuals can benefit from it. You can structure your suggestion regarding resource allocation because most tools enable you to save a ton of time or utilize your resources more effectively.

Avoid using first-person pronouns. Consider the big picture and how it will affect the whole company or particular departments. Explain how the tool’s benefits outweigh the costs and improve the work processes. How exactly does it allow you to multiply your efforts? Who will benefit from it, both now and afterward, and how?

It is your job to demonstrate the usefulness of new technologies to our teams so that they can embrace them without feeling pressured to abandon what is already working for them.

3. Reward employees

Numerous studies have proven that rewards and praise are considerably superior to punishments and reprimands when introducing novel procedures. Compared to companies without an employee appreciation program, those with one reported a 31% decrease in voluntary turnover among their staff.

Instead of punishing workers who don’t perform, it could be better to incentivize those who do. These incentives might be anything from financial bonuses to new perks.

Moreover, 41% of businesses that use peer reward and recognition programs also report a significant rise in customer satisfaction.

If you provide incentives for your workers, they will be more inclined to take up the new tools you’re introducing and feel more invested in their work. The effect of it cascades down the lines and immediately shows up in the customers’ satisfaction.

4. Get the leadership on board

Leaders are the first group you should impress with your initiative’s worth because they have the power to create or break things. Your tool will not succeed unless you can persuade people of its superiority.

Therefore, you should prepare for your debut here. Leaders are usually aware of the areas in which their teams are weakest and are therefore in an excellent position to determine whether or not a new tool would be beneficial. Get feedback from them on how effective your messaging is, and use that to make adjustments.

You can also solicit feedback on your launch schedule and overall project plan. Your ability to sell your tool to the group will improve by the end of the discussion.

Managers and executives may initially be your most vocal opponents, but they often turn out to be your most ardent supporters once they see the value in your technology.

Learn how to obtain executive sponsorship for adopting Microsoft Teams.

5. Set training before launch

Some onboarding and training will be necessary even for the most user-friendly business process management solutions, especially for staff members who are less comfortable with technology. Training and orientation should be tailored to each employee’s needs rather than standard practice.

Delegate training and counseling responsibilities to a coach or another designated individual for employees who require additional hand-holding and support.

There will be people who have trouble adapting, so set a good example. Participate in the training program to show how seriously you take this investment in your staff. 

Being open and honest with a trainee is the best way to determine which training method would work best for them. Please consult with your teams to find out the best way to train them, whether through scheduled live demos of the new system, digital recordings of those demos, or a social media tool. 

Adoption rates are only relevant when late adopters join the fold. Those in an organization who are slow to adopt new technologies might cause serious problems. Determine what prevents different groups from adopting the latest technology, and work to address it. 

Although the medium of incentive may shift throughout time, the desire to reward and motivate employees remains constant. A leader’s ability to keep their finger on the organization’s pulse and understand what motivates their team members is crucial for maintaining high levels of adoption.

6. Find out why people are reluctant to adopt it

Adoption rates are only relevant when late adopters join the fold. Those in an organization who are slow to adopt new technologies might cause serious problems. Determine what prevents different groups from adopting the latest technology, and work to address it.

Although the medium of incentive may shift throughout time, the desire to reward and motivate employees remains constant. A leader’s ability to keep their finger on the organization’s pulse and understand what motivates their team members is crucial for maintaining high levels of adoption.

7. Find your champions    

Champions are the employees that are in favor of the new technology you’re adapting and are succeeding in using it. Their role is crucial because they provide users with resources and guidance as they adopt a new tool. 

Your champions are an essential part of your adoption strategy because they spread the word about the benefits of the new technology and assist others in becoming proficient users. Their enthusiasm extends beyond just using it themselves to spreading the word and helping others adopt it.

However, you will need to look for your champions through various strategies as they won’t necessarily be IT geniuses with extensive experience with the technology. A champion could be anyone with a wish to learn more and be helpful to others.

Here are a few examples of how you can recruit champions: 

  1. Attract volunteers through engaging activities
  2. Consult with business unit heads
  3. Use internal social media or collaboration tools to make announcements about the search of champions.

Learn how to develop your network of champions.

8. Penalties are still important

Rewarding those who actively promote the use of new technology is crucial, but sanctions and disciplinary procedures may also be necessary. However, it’s better to wait and see if other encouraging methods work before punishing people who aren’t putting in the required effort.

According to research published in the Harvard Business Review, rewarding the desired conduct is considerably more successful than punishing the undesirable. One reason is that we respond better to rewards than punishments on the job.

9. Carefully select your tools

Naturally, you’d put meeting your company’s specific requirements at the forefront of your mind while you search for a solution. However, assessing your current team and the environment into which any new technology will be introduced before beginning your search is crucial.

Never overlook the user experience (UX). Even if a tool meets all of your requirements, it won’t be helpful if most of your team members find the experience disagreeable.

If you want a better adoption rate, you should compare different systems and think about how easy they are to use.

When possible, have your team participate in demos of potential process management technologies, solicit their opinions, and let them know they will have a say in the final decision.

10.  Develop a comprehensive strategy for dealing with transitions

To ensure that employees utilize new technological tools and boost productivity, you must create a solid change management/implementation team.

A leader should organize specific events and forums to honor and award “champions,” as well as a constant communication effort across the organization or team to raise awareness of the benefits.

This will encourage everyone on the team to utilize the technological resources to reap the hoped-for gains.

Conclusion

You’ll need as many methods to work with your diverse staff as you do tools in your extensive toolset to implement your new business process management solution successfully. Following the advice above and consulting your team’s managers, implementing the latest technology should go off without a hitch.

A well-implemented technology has the potential to transform the way your team works completely and possibly the entire company. And in retrospect, you might wonder how you managed without it.

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